art470 thoughts & process

Wayfaring was a project that kept changing. For the better part of the time that we had to work on this last assignment, I never felt like I knew what I was doing. I often felt lost, confused, and unsure of why/what I was doing, and I experienced a lot of self doubt around the work I was making. Ultimately, I am happy with the end result, and it is in large part due to the feedback from some of the people who came in to speak with us in class (Jason Sturgill! Matti Jonsson! You’re awesome!)
My project initially suffered from a lack of focus, lack of clear objective, and lack of clear branding/identity and no firm goals for what it would eventually be, other than just a book about walking. I feel that it is not lacking those things anymore, and actually is a much stronger project than I had initally intended to make. I have a clear conception of who the audience is, how this lives in the real world, and why it was created in the first place. I consider this a success.
The final form that this project shaped into is a book that documents 8 walks I took in Portland, examines the notion of “the flaneur”, and serves as a vehicle for my writing, photography and pattern illustrations, as well as editorial design and production. It is accompanied by a set of miniature notebooks that serve as a participatory aspect for the reader to engage on their own terms with the framework I created. A set of postcards completes the kit, and is drawn from the book’s imagery, as well as associated words/ideas that were mentioned in the main volume. The whole set is then represented in a set of digital wireframes for a website that I do hope to build this summer, which will serve as the hub of this project, selling the book, the accompanying notebooks, postcards, and upcoming publications. I then tied all of this work together into a brand standards guide. 
Altogether I am happy with the outcome. I learned a lot about rubber stamps, messy ink, different types of beautiful heavyweight cover stock (I love French Paper Co!) as well as about production of multiple books. I am excited at the thought of building the website, and I feel like it is not something that is outside of my skills. This was an unplanned bonus. Keep your eye out for wayfaringtravelogue.com and I am excited to see where this might end up. I feel like this project dovetails nicely with my travel journal project, and I am really happy with the overall work that I made during this term. Happy to be finished, and happy with what I have created, all in all a great way to wrap up an excellent class!Wayfaring was a project that kept changing. For the better part of the time that we had to work on this last assignment, I never felt like I knew what I was doing. I often felt lost, confused, and unsure of why/what I was doing, and I experienced a lot of self doubt around the work I was making. Ultimately, I am happy with the end result, and it is in large part due to the feedback from some of the people who came in to speak with us in class (Jason Sturgill! Matti Jonsson! You’re awesome!)
My project initially suffered from a lack of focus, lack of clear objective, and lack of clear branding/identity and no firm goals for what it would eventually be, other than just a book about walking. I feel that it is not lacking those things anymore, and actually is a much stronger project than I had initally intended to make. I have a clear conception of who the audience is, how this lives in the real world, and why it was created in the first place. I consider this a success.
The final form that this project shaped into is a book that documents 8 walks I took in Portland, examines the notion of “the flaneur”, and serves as a vehicle for my writing, photography and pattern illustrations, as well as editorial design and production. It is accompanied by a set of miniature notebooks that serve as a participatory aspect for the reader to engage on their own terms with the framework I created. A set of postcards completes the kit, and is drawn from the book’s imagery, as well as associated words/ideas that were mentioned in the main volume. The whole set is then represented in a set of digital wireframes for a website that I do hope to build this summer, which will serve as the hub of this project, selling the book, the accompanying notebooks, postcards, and upcoming publications. I then tied all of this work together into a brand standards guide. 
Altogether I am happy with the outcome. I learned a lot about rubber stamps, messy ink, different types of beautiful heavyweight cover stock (I love French Paper Co!) as well as about production of multiple books. I am excited at the thought of building the website, and I feel like it is not something that is outside of my skills. This was an unplanned bonus. Keep your eye out for wayfaringtravelogue.com and I am excited to see where this might end up. I feel like this project dovetails nicely with my travel journal project, and I am really happy with the overall work that I made during this term. Happy to be finished, and happy with what I have created, all in all a great way to wrap up an excellent class!Wayfaring was a project that kept changing. For the better part of the time that we had to work on this last assignment, I never felt like I knew what I was doing. I often felt lost, confused, and unsure of why/what I was doing, and I experienced a lot of self doubt around the work I was making. Ultimately, I am happy with the end result, and it is in large part due to the feedback from some of the people who came in to speak with us in class (Jason Sturgill! Matti Jonsson! You’re awesome!)
My project initially suffered from a lack of focus, lack of clear objective, and lack of clear branding/identity and no firm goals for what it would eventually be, other than just a book about walking. I feel that it is not lacking those things anymore, and actually is a much stronger project than I had initally intended to make. I have a clear conception of who the audience is, how this lives in the real world, and why it was created in the first place. I consider this a success.
The final form that this project shaped into is a book that documents 8 walks I took in Portland, examines the notion of “the flaneur”, and serves as a vehicle for my writing, photography and pattern illustrations, as well as editorial design and production. It is accompanied by a set of miniature notebooks that serve as a participatory aspect for the reader to engage on their own terms with the framework I created. A set of postcards completes the kit, and is drawn from the book’s imagery, as well as associated words/ideas that were mentioned in the main volume. The whole set is then represented in a set of digital wireframes for a website that I do hope to build this summer, which will serve as the hub of this project, selling the book, the accompanying notebooks, postcards, and upcoming publications. I then tied all of this work together into a brand standards guide. 
Altogether I am happy with the outcome. I learned a lot about rubber stamps, messy ink, different types of beautiful heavyweight cover stock (I love French Paper Co!) as well as about production of multiple books. I am excited at the thought of building the website, and I feel like it is not something that is outside of my skills. This was an unplanned bonus. Keep your eye out for wayfaringtravelogue.com and I am excited to see where this might end up. I feel like this project dovetails nicely with my travel journal project, and I am really happy with the overall work that I made during this term. Happy to be finished, and happy with what I have created, all in all a great way to wrap up an excellent class!Wayfaring was a project that kept changing. For the better part of the time that we had to work on this last assignment, I never felt like I knew what I was doing. I often felt lost, confused, and unsure of why/what I was doing, and I experienced a lot of self doubt around the work I was making. Ultimately, I am happy with the end result, and it is in large part due to the feedback from some of the people who came in to speak with us in class (Jason Sturgill! Matti Jonsson! You’re awesome!)
My project initially suffered from a lack of focus, lack of clear objective, and lack of clear branding/identity and no firm goals for what it would eventually be, other than just a book about walking. I feel that it is not lacking those things anymore, and actually is a much stronger project than I had initally intended to make. I have a clear conception of who the audience is, how this lives in the real world, and why it was created in the first place. I consider this a success.
The final form that this project shaped into is a book that documents 8 walks I took in Portland, examines the notion of “the flaneur”, and serves as a vehicle for my writing, photography and pattern illustrations, as well as editorial design and production. It is accompanied by a set of miniature notebooks that serve as a participatory aspect for the reader to engage on their own terms with the framework I created. A set of postcards completes the kit, and is drawn from the book’s imagery, as well as associated words/ideas that were mentioned in the main volume. The whole set is then represented in a set of digital wireframes for a website that I do hope to build this summer, which will serve as the hub of this project, selling the book, the accompanying notebooks, postcards, and upcoming publications. I then tied all of this work together into a brand standards guide. 
Altogether I am happy with the outcome. I learned a lot about rubber stamps, messy ink, different types of beautiful heavyweight cover stock (I love French Paper Co!) as well as about production of multiple books. I am excited at the thought of building the website, and I feel like it is not something that is outside of my skills. This was an unplanned bonus. Keep your eye out for wayfaringtravelogue.com and I am excited to see where this might end up. I feel like this project dovetails nicely with my travel journal project, and I am really happy with the overall work that I made during this term. Happy to be finished, and happy with what I have created, all in all a great way to wrap up an excellent class!Wayfaring was a project that kept changing. For the better part of the time that we had to work on this last assignment, I never felt like I knew what I was doing. I often felt lost, confused, and unsure of why/what I was doing, and I experienced a lot of self doubt around the work I was making. Ultimately, I am happy with the end result, and it is in large part due to the feedback from some of the people who came in to speak with us in class (Jason Sturgill! Matti Jonsson! You’re awesome!)
My project initially suffered from a lack of focus, lack of clear objective, and lack of clear branding/identity and no firm goals for what it would eventually be, other than just a book about walking. I feel that it is not lacking those things anymore, and actually is a much stronger project than I had initally intended to make. I have a clear conception of who the audience is, how this lives in the real world, and why it was created in the first place. I consider this a success.
The final form that this project shaped into is a book that documents 8 walks I took in Portland, examines the notion of “the flaneur”, and serves as a vehicle for my writing, photography and pattern illustrations, as well as editorial design and production. It is accompanied by a set of miniature notebooks that serve as a participatory aspect for the reader to engage on their own terms with the framework I created. A set of postcards completes the kit, and is drawn from the book’s imagery, as well as associated words/ideas that were mentioned in the main volume. The whole set is then represented in a set of digital wireframes for a website that I do hope to build this summer, which will serve as the hub of this project, selling the book, the accompanying notebooks, postcards, and upcoming publications. I then tied all of this work together into a brand standards guide. 
Altogether I am happy with the outcome. I learned a lot about rubber stamps, messy ink, different types of beautiful heavyweight cover stock (I love French Paper Co!) as well as about production of multiple books. I am excited at the thought of building the website, and I feel like it is not something that is outside of my skills. This was an unplanned bonus. Keep your eye out for wayfaringtravelogue.com and I am excited to see where this might end up. I feel like this project dovetails nicely with my travel journal project, and I am really happy with the overall work that I made during this term. Happy to be finished, and happy with what I have created, all in all a great way to wrap up an excellent class!

Wayfaring was a project that kept changing. For the better part of the time that we had to work on this last assignment, I never felt like I knew what I was doing. I often felt lost, confused, and unsure of why/what I was doing, and I experienced a lot of self doubt around the work I was making. Ultimately, I am happy with the end result, and it is in large part due to the feedback from some of the people who came in to speak with us in class (Jason Sturgill! Matti Jonsson! You’re awesome!)

My project initially suffered from a lack of focus, lack of clear objective, and lack of clear branding/identity and no firm goals for what it would eventually be, other than just a book about walking. I feel that it is not lacking those things anymore, and actually is a much stronger project than I had initally intended to make. I have a clear conception of who the audience is, how this lives in the real world, and why it was created in the first place. I consider this a success.

The final form that this project shaped into is a book that documents 8 walks I took in Portland, examines the notion of “the flaneur”, and serves as a vehicle for my writing, photography and pattern illustrations, as well as editorial design and production. It is accompanied by a set of miniature notebooks that serve as a participatory aspect for the reader to engage on their own terms with the framework I created. A set of postcards completes the kit, and is drawn from the book’s imagery, as well as associated words/ideas that were mentioned in the main volume. The whole set is then represented in a set of digital wireframes for a website that I do hope to build this summer, which will serve as the hub of this project, selling the book, the accompanying notebooks, postcards, and upcoming publications. I then tied all of this work together into a brand standards guide. 

Altogether I am happy with the outcome. I learned a lot about rubber stamps, messy ink, different types of beautiful heavyweight cover stock (I love French Paper Co!) as well as about production of multiple books. I am excited at the thought of building the website, and I feel like it is not something that is outside of my skills. This was an unplanned bonus. Keep your eye out for wayfaringtravelogue.com and I am excited to see where this might end up. I feel like this project dovetails nicely with my travel journal project, and I am really happy with the overall work that I made during this term. Happy to be finished, and happy with what I have created, all in all a great way to wrap up an excellent class!


Reading Response 19 & 20, Chapters 8-9
While I enjoyed both chapters in this reading, I would have to say that without a doubt chapter 20 was one of my favorites in the book and so I of course have much more to say about that then the previous chapter, but I will share a few things that resonated in chapter 8 before I move over there. So Shaughnessy is looking into the future and present state of design, and comparing it to the places it has been before. He sees the definition of the disicipline as outdated and the frame for viewing it as having shifted as well, and he’s right, things have changed and keep on changing. He talks about the growing roles of design, and the growth of places where designers reside, and how this has shifted the field. True. The thoughts on social design were interesting to read, and I liked the way he helped shape the idea of what social design is, because I too had a narrower view of what it should be. I definitely liked the discussion about design thinking, especially the part about viewing it as using the type of thinking we refer to as “wondering,” I thought that this was a great way to talk about the concept. I am not sure how I feel about the whole branding issue that he brings up. I thought it was an interesting viewpoint that had some very true things to be said, and is all the more important of a reason why we should work to be as  good of a face as possible for the field of design, lest we get swept up with less desireable associations. 

OK. this last chapter was awesome and I really enjoyed it. I love a good discussion about the hows and whys of creativity and the creative process, because it is such a mystifying thing to me, and I am supposedly a “creative person.” First off, that mathematical equation is great. I am glad to hear someone say that success comes from work not divine inspiration, and that yes, inspiriation happens, but only if you are working! So often it’s thought that like a lightening bolt comes down from above with a good idea and then bam there it is. you never hear that you just have to keep working, and working and eventually then something shifts, and there you have it, a good idea is made. That the process is much like all good things in life: it takes hard work and effort, doesn’t grow on trees. 
The section on briefs was also interesting. I appreciated the part about how while you can make your own brief but the best work comes from a response to an externally generated one, because designers function best within constraints. I know this to be true for myself, and especially in this thesis class, have felt a bit adrift in all the possibilities of what could be done, when sometimes it’s just too many possible outcomes to even know where to begin. 

Another highlight of this section was re: editing. I like to write, and am always trying to chop out excess words. Its exactly like what we need to do as a designer, but with images and ideas. Curating and paring something down to the essential is much more challenging than coming up with a ton of different scattered thoughts. Editing requires knowing what you want, knowing what is superfluous, and knowing how to let things go. That’s not always the easiest thing to do especially if you are the person who made the things that are getting thrown out. It means letting go of ego, trying to find the right solution for the problem at hand, and really examining why you are doing what you’re doing and who it’s for. Iteration does go hand in hand with editing. While we can make so many versions, it’s knowing when to cut things and let them go away and find the strengths that we are being successful. Our job as a designer is also a curator, and that is flexing the muscle of discerning what is best for the given needs. 
In summary, I am definitely keeping this book on the shelves for future reference. Shaugnessy ends the book with a painfully wonderful observation, his discussion of overcoming fears and how this is much of what being a successful designer is all about. I agree that much of my own journey to this point has been drowning out negative self talk and teaching myself diligence and persistence in the face of ennui and mediocrity, which are sometimes viewed in a positive light in some circles I have frequented. My path as a designer is fraught with self criticism, being my own worst enemy, and trying to move forward even when fear makes things seem much larger than they actually are. In a way, design is teaching me about life, and life about design, and it ends up being a really symbiotic relationship. Shaugnessy gets that, and thats why I’m into this book. Great read, well written, and I feel like I got a lot out of this book both for my career but also just ways to be a better person and designer. Reading Response 19 & 20, Chapters 8-9
While I enjoyed both chapters in this reading, I would have to say that without a doubt chapter 20 was one of my favorites in the book and so I of course have much more to say about that then the previous chapter, but I will share a few things that resonated in chapter 8 before I move over there. So Shaughnessy is looking into the future and present state of design, and comparing it to the places it has been before. He sees the definition of the disicipline as outdated and the frame for viewing it as having shifted as well, and he’s right, things have changed and keep on changing. He talks about the growing roles of design, and the growth of places where designers reside, and how this has shifted the field. True. The thoughts on social design were interesting to read, and I liked the way he helped shape the idea of what social design is, because I too had a narrower view of what it should be. I definitely liked the discussion about design thinking, especially the part about viewing it as using the type of thinking we refer to as “wondering,” I thought that this was a great way to talk about the concept. I am not sure how I feel about the whole branding issue that he brings up. I thought it was an interesting viewpoint that had some very true things to be said, and is all the more important of a reason why we should work to be as  good of a face as possible for the field of design, lest we get swept up with less desireable associations. 

OK. this last chapter was awesome and I really enjoyed it. I love a good discussion about the hows and whys of creativity and the creative process, because it is such a mystifying thing to me, and I am supposedly a “creative person.” First off, that mathematical equation is great. I am glad to hear someone say that success comes from work not divine inspiration, and that yes, inspiriation happens, but only if you are working! So often it’s thought that like a lightening bolt comes down from above with a good idea and then bam there it is. you never hear that you just have to keep working, and working and eventually then something shifts, and there you have it, a good idea is made. That the process is much like all good things in life: it takes hard work and effort, doesn’t grow on trees. 
The section on briefs was also interesting. I appreciated the part about how while you can make your own brief but the best work comes from a response to an externally generated one, because designers function best within constraints. I know this to be true for myself, and especially in this thesis class, have felt a bit adrift in all the possibilities of what could be done, when sometimes it’s just too many possible outcomes to even know where to begin. 

Another highlight of this section was re: editing. I like to write, and am always trying to chop out excess words. Its exactly like what we need to do as a designer, but with images and ideas. Curating and paring something down to the essential is much more challenging than coming up with a ton of different scattered thoughts. Editing requires knowing what you want, knowing what is superfluous, and knowing how to let things go. That’s not always the easiest thing to do especially if you are the person who made the things that are getting thrown out. It means letting go of ego, trying to find the right solution for the problem at hand, and really examining why you are doing what you’re doing and who it’s for. Iteration does go hand in hand with editing. While we can make so many versions, it’s knowing when to cut things and let them go away and find the strengths that we are being successful. Our job as a designer is also a curator, and that is flexing the muscle of discerning what is best for the given needs. 
In summary, I am definitely keeping this book on the shelves for future reference. Shaugnessy ends the book with a painfully wonderful observation, his discussion of overcoming fears and how this is much of what being a successful designer is all about. I agree that much of my own journey to this point has been drowning out negative self talk and teaching myself diligence and persistence in the face of ennui and mediocrity, which are sometimes viewed in a positive light in some circles I have frequented. My path as a designer is fraught with self criticism, being my own worst enemy, and trying to move forward even when fear makes things seem much larger than they actually are. In a way, design is teaching me about life, and life about design, and it ends up being a really symbiotic relationship. Shaugnessy gets that, and thats why I’m into this book. Great read, well written, and I feel like I got a lot out of this book both for my career but also just ways to be a better person and designer. 

Reading Response 19 & 20, Chapters 8-9

While I enjoyed both chapters in this reading, I would have to say that without a doubt chapter 20 was one of my favorites in the book and so I of course have much more to say about that then the previous chapter, but I will share a few things that resonated in chapter 8 before I move over there. So Shaughnessy is looking into the future and present state of design, and comparing it to the places it has been before. He sees the definition of the disicipline as outdated and the frame for viewing it as having shifted as well, and he’s right, things have changed and keep on changing. He talks about the growing roles of design, and the growth of places where designers reside, and how this has shifted the field. True. The thoughts on social design were interesting to read, and I liked the way he helped shape the idea of what social design is, because I too had a narrower view of what it should be. I definitely liked the discussion about design thinking, especially the part about viewing it as using the type of thinking we refer to as “wondering,” I thought that this was a great way to talk about the concept. I am not sure how I feel about the whole branding issue that he brings up. I thought it was an interesting viewpoint that had some very true things to be said, and is all the more important of a reason why we should work to be as  good of a face as possible for the field of design, lest we get swept up with less desireable associations. 

OK. this last chapter was awesome and I really enjoyed it. I love a good discussion about the hows and whys of creativity and the creative process, because it is such a mystifying thing to me, and I am supposedly a “creative person.” First off, that mathematical equation is great. I am glad to hear someone say that success comes from work not divine inspiration, and that yes, inspiriation happens, but only if you are working! So often it’s thought that like a lightening bolt comes down from above with a good idea and then bam there it is. you never hear that you just have to keep working, and working and eventually then something shifts, and there you have it, a good idea is made. That the process is much like all good things in life: it takes hard work and effort, doesn’t grow on trees. 

The section on briefs was also interesting. I appreciated the part about how while you can make your own brief but the best work comes from a response to an externally generated one, because designers function best within constraints. I know this to be true for myself, and especially in this thesis class, have felt a bit adrift in all the possibilities of what could be done, when sometimes it’s just too many possible outcomes to even know where to begin. 

Another highlight of this section was re: editing. I like to write, and am always trying to chop out excess words. Its exactly like what we need to do as a designer, but with images and ideas. Curating and paring something down to the essential is much more challenging than coming up with a ton of different scattered thoughts. Editing requires knowing what you want, knowing what is superfluous, and knowing how to let things go. That’s not always the easiest thing to do especially if you are the person who made the things that are getting thrown out. It means letting go of ego, trying to find the right solution for the problem at hand, and really examining why you are doing what you’re doing and who it’s for. Iteration does go hand in hand with editing. While we can make so many versions, it’s knowing when to cut things and let them go away and find the strengths that we are being successful. Our job as a designer is also a curator, and that is flexing the muscle of discerning what is best for the given needs. 

In summary, I am definitely keeping this book on the shelves for future reference. Shaugnessy ends the book with a painfully wonderful observation, his discussion of overcoming fears and how this is much of what being a successful designer is all about. I agree that much of my own journey to this point has been drowning out negative self talk and teaching myself diligence and persistence in the face of ennui and mediocrity, which are sometimes viewed in a positive light in some circles I have frequented. My path as a designer is fraught with self criticism, being my own worst enemy, and trying to move forward even when fear makes things seem much larger than they actually are. In a way, design is teaching me about life, and life about design, and it ends up being a really symbiotic relationship. Shaugnessy gets that, and thats why I’m into this book. Great read, well written, and I feel like I got a lot out of this book both for my career but also just ways to be a better person and designer. 


reading responses 17&18, chapters 5-7

While I consistently enjoy the readings from this book, I found less directly relevant information in this series of chapters than I had in previous sections, but this is not to say that I didn’t resonate with what was on offer overall. The first thing that jumped off the page to me was in the section about spotting talent. I appreciated the formula to finding good people: talent, suitability, and potential. This list tells me (as a job seeker) that hard work, a good personality and dedication will all be traits that an employer will look for and encourage, and that being someone who can get along and integrate into a wide variety of situations will help open doors in the future.

The concept of “having a philosophy” also stuck out to me in this chapter. I like that Shaughnessy points out that having a strong set of beliefs will attract work, and bring in the types of clients that you want to work with. I know that I  agree with his assertion that being genuine is a way to connect with clients, and that having principles and sticking to them is only going to garner respect and draw good things to you and your studio, in keeping with a sort of “law of attraction.”

Chapter six had a few different highlights for me: the paradox of attracting good work by making good work is definitely interesting and also a bit daunting as someone trying to get into the field. The concept of the database is also intriguing. I guess in some ways we have social media to thank for making this a bit easier, but the thought of actively maintining the database to be sure not to commit a faux pas was something I hadn’t thought about before but is definitely wise advice. What a great way to lose a potential job than by sticking your foot in your mouth because you didn’t do thorough research.

Lastly, I appreciated the discussion of reputation, as it confirms some thinking that I have been doing since I entered into the design program. I have this theory that every single time you interact with a person (student/teacher, whoever) you are constantly informing their perception of you, and that the actions you take/dont take (being on time/late, going above and beyond or doing the bare minimum, helping others, participation, reliability, etc) that all of these things are being entered into an invisible mental spreadsheet that is being filed away for a later date, and that one day, when you need some help, or a recommendation, or what have you, that these invisible spreadsheets will be consulted and the response you get from this person you are asking for help will be directly proportional to the amount of energy/ effort/ quality of work/ personal respect / etc that you have showed in these previous actions. That being on time shows you respect someone. That treating others with kindness is a sign of a warm personality and someone you’d like to have around, and that hard work is not just a finished result, but the process that was taken to arrive at this endpoint. OK I digress, but for reals- Shaughnessy nails it when he says that a reptuation is earned, and I believe that as design students, we have already started on this road, because the people in this classroom, our peers and mentors, they will be people we seek jobs from, assistance from, or interview in front of, so there’s no time like the present to live the way you talk and the be the person you want to be. Rant over, sorry.

Finally, a few words on chapter 7. I liked the thought of trying to find what each client needs and filling that role, in a sense it is the designer as chameleon. Also, the thought of equality in client relations is something that I hope to achieve. I have been lucky in my few dealings in that I have worked with clear communicators who respect the design process, and I know that I have been lucky. The section about challenging clients is a bit trickier for me, I inherently want to make people happy, and it will take a bit of practice to tell someone clearly why what they want is wrong, but I think tact comes through practice and self confidence, and these things grow with time. All in all, this book makes me excited to get out into the real world and start putting this theory into practice!


here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.
It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think). 
The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… 

here is some new work on Travelogue… I am indroducing a really analog element of graph paper which I feel is a trigger for the concept of “writing” and is an interesting visual counterpoint to the organic patterns and photography that I have going on in the piece.

It also provides a good segue into the second deliverable that I am working on, which is a miniature sized cahier/notebook (3.5”x5.5”) that incorporates the patterns as well as the data standardization I used on my walks as a way for someone else to participate. Going to bind the mini cahier with red railroad board and print the title on the cover (i think).

The mark is totally under construction. It is not a mark yet but it will be! I am not sure if I want it to use the patterns anymore or not, I think I might just want it to be a clear typographic mark…. work in progress… 


changing my thesis!

OK! I am “revising” my thesis aka reframing it completely including a new name. Format is staying the same, but the content will shift a bit (scope widens so more can be included/ cast in different light) I think it will fit nicely with my Carnet de Voyage piece and I think it will ultimately be more successful and have a bit wider audience. It is being framed as the first in a series of documented investigations into place. Envisioning the concept of travel as a state of mind, and not solely a verb. 

I’m calling it “Travelogue Vol. 1 Portland” and I feel better about things already. Here is the new introduction that I wrote tonight. Sidenote: that Ommwriter writing app is really wonderful. thanks for the tip Kate!

 

 

Travelogue Vol. 1, Portland, Ore. 

Introduction

I have never been the type of traveler that blows through a city in a matter of days. I like to take my time getting to know a place. When I arrive somewhere new, I always set out on foot and get to know my surroundings. The feeling of setting out into the unknown, armed with nothing but a camera and a journal is a sensation that I have appreciated in many places all around the world, and it is a feeling that I miss having as a part of my daily life. Unlike living abroad, the novelty of being at ‘home’ wears off quickly and almost without noticing, I find myself slipping into a life of routines and deadlines and getting farther away from that life of wandering without a destination in mind.

After almost four years of living here, I have settled into routines. I take the same roads to get to the same places and I never go out of my way to discover something new. I have never applied the same level of curiosity to discovering the city of Portland as I have dedicated to the other places I have visited.

This book is an attempt to change my current level of engagement with the Rose City. Walking is a superior way to get to know the surroundings, and it seems fitting that I apply this same type of slow and meandering logic to my relationship with my current home town.

This book is a travelogue in the classic sense of being a document about a series of travels. This book is an unconventional travelogue in that it wasn’t necessary to go all that far away from home. All of the walks in this book take place within a 20 mile radius of downtown Portland.

It is important to note that travels can be many things: Inward or external; Large, expansive events or small, intimate or mundane. Regardless of their country of origin, the act of discovery is the unifying component of these experiences. It is through this act of choosing our outlook or perspective that the act of travel takes place.

Alexandra Kouzoukian
May 23, 2013
Portland, Ore.